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5
FAO/UNEP/UN-Energy Bioenergy Decision Support Tool -
MODULE 0: Introduction
circumstances for putting a bioenergy system into operation,
including such factors as training of operators, establishment
of needed infrastructure and provision of maintenance services.
Good Practices arise from many years of experience with the
deployment of technologies and the use of land resources for
bioenergy feedstock production.
Module 8 (Impacts) provides specifc and fairly detailed guiding
questions that can be used to evaluate the potential impacts of
bioenergy programmes and projects; in some cases the questions
can also be used at the strategy level. Since impacts vary widely
depending on the scale of the project and the type of biomass
resources used, the module also provides some guidance as to
when the more detailed questions are needed; for smaller projects
and/or those relying on wastes and residues, it may be suffcient
to use a simpler evaluation scheme to assess the key impacts.
Module 9 (Tools and Resources) essentially provides a toolbox
that supports all the other modules to some degree. Due to the
broad nature of the topics addressed in the DST and the focus on
decision processes rather than particular scientifc issues, Module
9 does not provide an exhaustive list of references. In particular,
journal articles, books and popular literature references are not
included here, although of course such references will often be
found in the Reference list for a given module.
Guidance for Users
Users of the DST will be at different phases in the development of
their bioenergy strategy or in the evaluation of bioenergy projects,
programmes or policies. Those users at an early stage of strategy
development are encouraged to use the entire DST in order to
obtain the maximum value from the supporting information and
linkages across knowledge modules. Other users may be at a
more advanced stage and thus may wish to rely mainly on one
or several modules rather than using the DST as an integrated
package. For this reason, each module is fairly self-contained in
order to allow the maximum fexibility to the user. Links, resources
and contacts are provided where more specifc or more detailed
information is relevant and available.
The many different types of users of the DST will naturally have
varying needs for the information in the different modules. Some
modules may not be relevant for some users; for example,
policymakers will be most interested in Module 2 on Strategy, and
will be less concerned with technical details or methodological
issues covered in supporting Modules such as 5, 6, 7 and 8. On
the other hand, a development offcer or feld offcer will have
special interest in Module 4 on Project Screening and Module 6
on People and Processes, since they may be confronted with
decisions related to specifc projects and will deal with different
types of stakeholders. An overview of different types of users
and the associated relevance of different modules to these users
is given in Table 1; in this context, “relevance” is interpreted as
the direct relevance for action, in relation to users’ own time
constraints and responsibilities; in fact, most users can beneft in
one way or another from all the modules.
Table 1: Expected direct relevance of modules for different users (*** = highest relevance)
Module 1
Techno-
economic
Background
Module 2
Designing a
Strategy
Module 3
Implemen-
tation and
Operations
Module 4
Project
Screening
Module 5
Land
Resources
Module 6
People and
Processes
Module 7
Innovative
Approaches
Module 8
Impacts
Policy-makers
*
***
**
**
*
**
*
*
Ministry or
agency staff
*
***
***
**
**
***
*
**
Technical
Consultants
**
*
*
**
***
*
**
**
Project Investors
or Developers
*
*
*
***
*
**
**
***
Development
Offcers
**
**
**
***
*
***
*
**
Field Offce Staff
**
*
**
***
***
**
**
***
Policy Analysts
**
**
*
*
**
**
**
**
Entrepreneurs
**
*
**
***
*
**
**
*