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Policymakers will need to consider the relationships among the various sectors and end-use options as they develop their bioenergy strategy, set priorities, and establish guidelines for investors. There can be a tendency to focus policy development on those areas that attract foreign investors, namely transport fuels and heat & power provision, while the traditional biomass sector and the agricultural sector receive less attention due to their domestic focus. In order for bioenergy strategies to support development and poverty reduction goals, there must be greater emphasis on agriculture and also on the opportunities to upgrade energy services in the household and small commercial sectors.

Traditional Biomass Sector

The traditional biomass sector includes household and institutional use of biomass for cooking, heating and light-ing. Although the majority of traditional biomass is burned in solid form, use of biogas has expanded considerably in some regions and there is also some use of refined liquid fuels (e.g. ethanol, SVO, gels and briquettes) for cooking.

Agriculture

Modern bioenergy will transform the agricultural sector by providing additional roles to the existing ones of being the guarantor of food security and the basis of rural livelihoods. The expansion in bioenergy will link the agricultural sector to the industrial sector.

Heat & Power

Bioenergy for heat and power is provided at different scales. Small industries can make use of low-grade heat, mechanical energy and off-grid electricity. Large industries will need continuous electricity supply and may require high-pressure steam.

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